Guttenberg Idyl

I spent most of June on the river with my brother Mark. We had a great time and a visit from his son Austin. [Gallery]

There were lots of birds! To start we had this fellow right outside our front door for several mornings…

The Gray Catbird is related to Mockingbirds, and it shows!

The Turtles were on the march to lay their eggs…

There were several storms the first week, most with afternoon rainbows. Check out this HDR Panorama… [click to enlarge]

I went up to Pike’s Peak State Park for a walk in the woods. Very pleasant, few people, not many flowers, lots of ferns…


We had a family gathering for my Aunt Katherine’s 90th Birthday

Mark, Austin and I ventured over to Glen Haven, Wisconsin to partake of Taco Night and a friendly game of billiards…

A pair of Red-Winged Blackbirds had a nest in one of our shrubs. The young birds were up and out about ten days after hatching. I couldn’t get real close because the momma bird was very upset with me (and rightfully so!).

⇐ click to enlarge


Dickcissel
Yellow Warbler
American Redstart

I saw Indigo Buntings and Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks three or four times when I was cycling on the backroads. Other birds included…

Austin and I went over to the Motor Mill and it was unexpectedly open for tours! We went from the basement to the attic. It is a very cool building!

I now have a much better idea of how it worked. They think there was a wooden dam and a flume wall that brought the water into the basement (lower right below the grass) where it turned three vertical turbines (two for the grindstones and one for everything else). This Diagram gives some sense of the complexity inside.

After our tour we took a pleasant bike ride on the Pony Hollow Trail and ran into this Eastern Bluebird family…

It was a great day! Even the rain held off until we were off the trail.

Ephesus Museum, Turkey

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For obvious reasons the finest artifacts have been removed from Ephesus and placed in a museum in a nearby city. The bust above is of Marcus Aurelius (Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 CE). [Gallery] The image below shows a Satyr pursuing a nymph or maiden.

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There were two statues of Asclepius (the god of healing). Unfortunately neither one is intact. [Notice the single snake on his staff, the symbol of medicine.]

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At the ruins we saw a line of eroded Bull’s Head Column Capitals. In the museum we got to see a better example up close! I love the anatomic detail including the bulging veins!

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The penultimate artifact was found carefully buried nearby (to hide it from vandals?), but did not originate there. This Statue of Artemis was originally housed within the Famous Temple to the Goddess (one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World!).

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To say this Fertility Cult figure is bizarre is to put it mildly! I can’t remember seeing an object with so much symbolic detail. One obvious question is “are those all breasts?” Our guide said they were thought to be Bulls’ Testicles (that’s right, testicles!). Lions, griffins, winged humans, bees and the signs of the zodiac are just some of the decorative motifs. [Gallery]

Ephesus Ruins, Turkey

The Ancient City of Ephesus dates to about 900 BCE. It was Hellenized by Alexander the Great and ultimately became the regional Roman Capital in 129 BCE. The ruins today are only 10% restored. The first photo shows the Greek-Style Theater (with up to 25,000 seats!) and the wide avenue leading down to the port (which has silted in). [Gallery]

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Here I am standing next to a Statue Honoring a Physician of that time…

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The Terraced Houses of the elite had fantastic mosaics and other artworks…

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The Library of Celsus was one of the largest in its day…

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The wonders were literally too numerous to count! [Gallery] [Museum]